NMFI pilot study

Our NMFI pilot study confirmed the value of mapping variables from published data to gain further insights into the causes of non-malaria febrile disease - explore the data below.

A literature search of incidence and prevalence of pathogens causing febrile disease in the Mekong region of Southeast Asia, published between 1986 and 2011, identified 1,252 papers involving reports of target pathogens considered in the differential diagnoses of malaria. Of these, 146 met the inclusion criteria for further analysis. Up to 12 variables were extracted from every paper, analysed, and each study mapped with basic descriptive data — including study type and frequency of a positive result — that may be viewed by clicking its marker on an interactive map.

The most frequently reported pathogens were dengue virus, followed by Orientia tsutsugamushi and Rickettsia species (scrub typhus/murine typhus/spotted fever group), Leptospira spp, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Paratyphi (enteric fever), Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis), and Japanese encephalitis virus. 

This pilot study confirmed the value of mapping variables from published data to gain further insights into the causes of non-malaria febrile illnesses. It resulted in the following publication: Acestor N et al 2012. Mapping the aetiology of non-malarial febrile illness in SE Asia – terra incognito impairing empirical treatment policies. PLoS One

Select the disease from the list below to view relevant studies and summary data identified from 146 studies describing the incidence and prevalence of pathogens – other than malaria – causing febrile disease in the Mekong region of Southeast Asia.